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To avoid climate chaos… Places that humanity should preserve

The Guardian newspaper (The GuardianBritish today, Friday, an important study by Conservation International – an American non-profit environmental organization based in Virginia – identified new and detailed maps of carbon-rich forests and peatlands – a type of wetland – that humanity should conserve and not destroy. To avoid a climate catastrophe.

The researchers found that vast forests and peatlands in Russia, Canada and the United States were vital, as were the tropical forests of the Amazon, Congo and Southeast Asia. Peat bogs in Britain and mangrove swamps and eucalyptus forests in Australia were also included in the list.

Scientists have identified 139 billion tons (gigatons) of carbon in trees, plants and soil as “unrecoverable,” meaning that natural renewal cannot replace its loss by 2050, the date by which global net net carbon emissions must end to avoid the worst impacts. global greenhouse.

In this context, scientists note that in the past decade alone agriculture, logging and wildfires have released at least 4 gigatonnes of unrecoverable carbon.

Scientists have identified 139 billion tons of carbon in trees, plants and soils as “unrecoverable,” meaning that natural renewal cannot replace its loss by 2050, the date by which net global carbon emissions must end to avoid the worst effects of the global greenhouse.

The study pointed to the importance of reducing the burning of fossil fuels to end the climate crisis, but it considered ending the deforestation of forests very important as well.

The researchers showed that Earth’s irrecoverable carbon is highly concentrated, and only 3.3% of it is found on the world’s land, making concentrated conservation projects very effective.

They found that half of the irrecoverable carbon is currently in protected areas, but adding 5.4% of the world’s land to these areas would provide 75% of this carbon.

The study pointed out that indigenous peoples are the best protectors of the Earth, but only a third of the non-recoverable carbon is stored in their recognized lands, and the stores of non-recoverable carbon strongly overlap with rich wildlife areas, so protecting them will also address the mass extinction that threatens wildlife.

Professor Pete Smith from the University of Aberdeen in the UK said: “This research presents a compelling case for where and how to focus efforts on existing initiatives to protect 30% of the Earth by 2030.”

The research, published in the journal Nature Sustainability, found that 57% of the irrecoverable carbon is in trees and plants and 43% in soil, especially peat, and concluded that the world’s peatlands store more carbon than tropical and semi-tropical forests. Tropical.

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Reference-www.aljazeera.net

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