Anne Will: Marco Buschmann as Minister for the Sunset

For some people who don’t like the FDP, Marco Buschmann falls into the same category as Christian Lindner: as a man of distinguished know-it-all. But whatever you think of his behavior – on this Sunday evening at Anne Will’s, you have to at least concede that the new Minister of Justice introduced a very nice term into the vocabulary of fighting the pandemic, the sunset clause.

On March 20, 2022, the mask requirement, 3G, 2G and 2G Plus would expire, Marco Buschmann announced when the traffic light began to rule. Anne Will reminds him of this, but Buschmann shows no remorse. It is his job to give the measures restricting freedom an expiry date, the “sunset clause”. Buschmann wisely does not announce a new expiry date for the time being. But it brings some clarity to the debate about mandatory vaccination, which should bring the country closer to the Corona sunset.

As Minister of Justice, he tends to only introduce compulsory vaccination for people over 50 years of age. If it is true that the risk of the healthcare system being overburdened is averted if all Germans over 50 are vaccinated, from a legal point of view there is also a lot to be said for the graduated obligation to vaccinate.

His political counterpart on the show, North Rhine-Westphalian Prime Minister Hendrik Wüst from the CDU, also wants to oblige people between 18 and 50 to poke. Like Buschmann, Wüst is a lawyer, which makes it all the more curious how he justifies the purpose of compulsory vaccination. Politicians must send a sign of gratitude to those who adhere to all corona rules and have been vaccinated: “Now it’s the others’ turn.” One would like to call out to him: Not like that, Mr. Wüst! A vaccination requirement cannot be there to send signs to anyone.

This is the ideal time for Alena Buyx to speak out. The professor of medical ethics and chairwoman of the German Ethics Council explains how individual rights should be weighed against the rights of the general public. She concludes that there are good reasons for compulsory vaccination in order to avoid overloading the healthcare system. She wishes that politics would now go “in medias res”. Because the traffic light coalition does not agree on the matter, the Bundestag is now holding an “orientation debate”.

In the further course of the studio debate – which is enriched by the FAZ journalist Helene Bubrowski and the intensive care doctor Uwe Janssens – the usual German corona depression creeps up on you. There are currently not enough PCR tests to get an overview of the pandemic situation; The city of Vienna alone, it is said, carries out more tests every day than the whole of Germany. There is a lack of data to get an overview of how the virus spreads. The state of digitization in the healthcare system suggests that the state will have great difficulty monitoring any vaccination requirement at all. And no sign of Sunset on the horizon.

Anne Will: Josef Kelnberger has been working for the SZ as a correspondent in Brussels since summer 2021.  His favorite programs there are Flemish talk shows: he doesn't understand a word, but feels well entertained.  Unfortunately, the opposite is often the case with German talk shows.

Josef Kelnberger has been working for the SZ as a correspondent in Brussels since summer 2021. His favorite programs there are Flemish talk shows: he doesn’t understand a word, but feels well entertained. Unfortunately, the opposite is often the case with German talk shows.

(Photo: Bernd Schifferdecker)

Reference-www.sueddeutsche.de

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